Archive CD Books Canada NEWSLETTER V8#08 - 16 January, 2012


Contents:

1 WELCOME

2 WHAT'S IN THE NEWSLETTER

3 NEW CANADIAN RELEASE (1)

4 COMING SOON

5 OTHER NEW RELEASES (10)

6 NEWS & GOSSIP

7 FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY AND OTHER ANNOUNCEMENTS:

8 PREVIOUSLY RELEASED BOOKS

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1 WELCOME:

Once more we join battle with another Canadian winter, each according to their particular location.  Traditionally this is our coldest period so what better time to curl up in front of our trusty (and warm) computer and look for a few more leaves to hang on that old family tree?


In this issue of our newsletter we release our latest Great War “Military Group” history, The 4th Canadian Mounted Rifles, as well as several more titles new titles from our Irish partner, this time about Irish subjects.


Not forgetting, of course, our latest news and gossip as well as news of Canadian Meetings and Events you might want to plan to attend.

   

Remember this Newsletter is published for you so if you think we're missing something important drop me a line to Malcolm@ArchiveCDBooks.ca.


Newsletters work best when they get a good circulation. We're doing our best to let people know about it but you could help us along by mentioning it to your genealogy buddies and generally spreading the word. Feel free to pass this copy along, but only in its complete form please.


All newsletter administration messages should be e-mailed to Books@ArchiveCDBooks.ca


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All previous newsletters may (eventually) be accessed by going to:

http://www.ArchiveCDBooks.ca/NewsletterArchive.html


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2 WHAT'S IN THE NEWSLETTER:


- One new Canadian release.

- 10 new Irish releases.

- and all our news, gossip and announcements.


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3. NEW CANADIAN CD RELEASES:


* 4th Canadian Mounted Rifles (The) 1914-1919

CA0385:  $24.75


When the author, Capt. S. G. Bennett, was commissioned to write the history of the Regiment he found himself in the fortunate position of having to pick and choose what of the wealth of detailed information available he could best use to produce an accurate, comprehensive, informative and readable book of a reasonable size.


One of his major choices was to dedicate about half the book (counted by page number*) to Appendices containing the service details of all of the men serving in the regiment as a Nominal Roll, and a few pages of Abbreviations and Indexes.  (*The pages in the book are numbered to 336, but when all unnumbered intro. and illustration pages are included the actual page count rises to 370.)


The other half of the book, then, provides a history of the activities of the Regiment from its voluntary beginnings through the official “establishment” and its physical assembly, largely from personnel of four of the existing Ontario based cavalry regiments: These were the Governor General’s Body Guard,  the 2nd Dragoons, the 9th Mississauga Horse and the 25th Brant Dragoons.  From this assembly on the Canadian National Exhibition grounds in Toronto, the story quickly proceeds through, equipping, training, the mass movement to Europe, and to a more exhaustive, and detailed, account of engagements with the enemy on the European battlefields.  


As you might expect the story is arranged in chronological order and a nice touch is margin notes identifying the applicable dates for that section of the text.  The author has distilled his account from many sources, including what has been “voted” as one of the best official war diaries and documents borrowed from the Historical Section of the General Staff.  The story is amply illustrated with 23 pages of photographs and situation maps.


While the account provides a great deal of detail about the individual engagements the regiment was involved in, only the names of the officers directly in charge tend to be mentioned.  However, the author claims to have been careful to include mention of ALL activities undertaken by the regiment, so the potential involvement of any particular individual, of any rank, can be implied from his service dates in the Nominal Roll and the dates of the actions.


This will be a wonderful resource for any researcher who can count a member of the 4th Canadian Mounted Rifles amongst their forbearers, or for students of the Great War at large.  This digital publication is fully text searchable through the application of our enhanced OCR and the search delay is minimized by our FastFind technology.


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4 COMING SOON:

As I mentioned in our last issue we have started work on the remaining two volumes of the four volume history of British Columbia, the two Biography volumes (3 & 4) of which we have already released.  Happily they seems to be coming along without many of the endless problems we’ve been suffering, due to the troublesome printing in the Canada wide commercial register, that has caused such delays in recent months.  Not to say we’ve given up on the Register, just that we’ve divided our forces between both projects in parallel.  The Register looks as if it is going to take several more months so it must be demoted to a lower priority.


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5.0 OTHER NEW RELEASES:

5.1 Irish topic New Releases from Archive CD Books Ireland.


-  Parish Register Society Of Dublin: 

By Act of Parliament in 1875 the parish registers of the Established Church of Ireland were placed under the Control of the Master of the Rolls. However, by the time of the publication of volume I of the Parish Register Society in 1906, one of the main conditions of the Act, namely the concentration, collection and depositing of the parish registers of the former Established Church in the Public Record Office of Ireland in Dublin, had not taken place. In a sense, and with hindsight, this transpired to be fortuitous as many of the parochial records that did find their way to the Public Record Office were destroyed in the infamous 1922 fire. In line with the formation of a number of Parish Register Societies in England, it was deemed necessary by the founding members of the Parish Register Society of Dublin to make publicly available the older and more important surviving parish registers of the Established Church of Ireland, beginning with the oldest in the country, those of Dublin City, for the valuable work undertaken by genealogists and local and family historians:


  *  The Register of the Parish of Saint Peter and Saint Kevin, Dublin, 1669-1791, 1911

IE0344:  $24.70

Printed for the Parish Register Society of Dublin by William Pollard & Co., and first published in 1911, this is volume IX of the Parish Register Society of Dublin, the Register of the Parish of St. Peter & St. Kevin, Dublin, 1669-1761. Republished here on fully searchable CD-Rom this republication contains the Christening, Marriage & Burial Registers from the first two surviving parish registers.

During the Restoration Dublin City began a period of rapid expansion and from the centre out to the periphery and this marked the rapid growth of the population within the Parishes of Saints Peter and Kevin, the bounds of which stretched as far as Rathmines, Haroldscross and Milltown to the south and east and to Aungier Steet, Bishop Street and Saint Stephen's Street in the west. However, because of the growth of the population within the parish a new church was required and in 1707 portions of St. Peter and St. Bride were taken to form the new parish of St. Anne. The current republication is a reprint of the earliest two parish registers for the union of Saints Peter and Kevin. The first register contains 476 pages and begins with the Vestry Minutes of St. Kevin's for the year 1669. The second register contains 118 parchment folios and commences in 1721 and ends in 1761. In the main the Christening Registers provide the child's name, parents' names, addresses and some cases the father's occupation. Likewise, the Burial Registers provide the name of the deceased, marital status of women and addresses. This republication also includes confirmation lists for the parish for 1722 and 1726 as well as a comprehensive names index. 


  *  The Registers of the Church of St. Michan, Dublin, 1636 - 1700

IE0348:  $24.70

Printed for the Parish Register Society of Dublin by Alexander Thom & Co., and first published in 1909 are volumes II, III and VII of the Parish Register Society of Dublin, the Registers of St. Michan, Dublin, 1634-1700. Republished here on fully searchable CD-Rom the registers for St. Michan are amongst the oldest surviving parish records in Ireland and unusually for city parishes from this period the register entries are of a most complete nature.

The Parish of St. Michan was from a very early period until the seventeenth century the only parish church standing on the north bank of the River Liffey. Tradition states that the Church was built in 1095 and encompassed the area bounded by Little Cabra, Dublin Bay, the Phoenix Park and the River Liffey. As the number of inhabitants within these bounds grew new parishes had to be divided out of the old St. Michan's, resulting in the formation in the mid-seventeenth-century of Saints Paul, John and lastly Thomas. The registers for St. Michan are unlike any those of the other old city parishes in as much as full-particulars are given for the deceased in the burial registers and in some instances the marriage entries, especially during the Commonwealth period, which run to as many as eight lines.


  *  Marriage Entries from the Registers of the Parishes St. Andrew, St. Anne, St. Audoen, & St. Bride 1632-1800 (1913)

IE0353:  $18.50

Printed for the Parish Register Society of Dublin by William Pollard & Co., and first published in 1913 is volume XI of the Parish Register Society of Dublin, the Marriage Entries for the Parishes of St. Andrew, St. Anne, St. Audoen & St. Bride, Dublin. Republished here on fully-searchable CD-Rom the registers are amongst the oldest surviving parish records in Ireland, and in three instances date from or very nearly to the foundations of the parishes in question.

Here are the marriage entries for St. Andrew dating from 1672 to 1800; St. Anne from 1719 to 1800; St. Audoen from 1672 to 1800 and St. Bride from 1632 to 1800. In the first two instances the republished registers date from virtually the foundation of the parishes and in the case of the second two few records pre-date 1632, although the churches are of much older origin. The Registers for St. Bride are noteworthy for a number of reasons, not least because of the large numbers of French names that occur due to the prevalence of French Huguenots that settled within the bounds of the parish. Appendices of occupations and places are included in this publication as are the names of famous individuals such as Napper Tandy and Wolfe Tone. The editor has crossed check the marriage entries against the Dublin Grant Index and has also provided marriage entries found in the Parochial Returns that were not found in the Parish Registers. All of this makes for a most satisfactory and complete publication and in the case of the Parish of St. Bride, the only records that now survive for the parish. The Republication of this number in the series of the Parish Register Society of Dublin remains as relevant to the genealogist and family historian today as they were when the registers were first published.


  *  The Register of St. Nicholas Without, Dublin, 1694-1739 (1912)

IE0354:  $18.50

Printed for the Parish Register Society of Dublin by William Pollard & Co., and first published in 1912 is volume X of the Parish Register Society of Dublin, the Register of St. Nicholas Without, Dublin, 1694-1739. Republished here on fully-searchable CD-Rom is the earliest surviving register for the Church of St. Nicholas Without which are amongst the oldest surviving parish records in Ireland and contain just over 300 pages of text, including an index of names and family names..

In many senses the Parish of St. Nicholas Without is an unusual City Parish. The parish itself was recognized as early as the 12th century, but had no church of its own, the parishioners worshipping in the north transept of the Cathedral Church of St. Patrick and burials taking place in the 'Cabbage Garden' close to the Cathedral. The parish of St. Nicholas Without extended from Kevin Street on the east, to the west end of the Coombe and from the wall on the north to the Cherryorchard near Haroldscross and all of the numerous streets and alleys in between. As a consequence it was probably more densely populated then than at the beginning of the 20th century. This situation led to the creation of the new parish of St. Luke. At the time of the restoration of St. Patrick's, St. Nicholas Without was removed from the Cathedral and reunited with St. Luke.

As to the registers themselves, far more Burials than Christenings and it has been surmised that while the registers contain the Christenings for only members of the Established Church, the Burial Registers hold the records for all denominations present in the parish. Until the early 1900s an earlier register for the parish was extant for the periods 1631-1660, but the whereabouts of this then as now is not known. While the Parish Register Society of Dublin had announced that this publication was to continue to 1739, through lack of subscriptions the burials contained therein were cut short and ceased in 1720. The general lack of monies from subscribers to the publication of the Parish Registers meant that that this issue was one of the last undertaken by the Society.



*  Thomas de Moleyns, Esq. The Landowner's and Agent's Practical Guide, 6th Edition, 1872

IE0345:  $30.90

Published in 1872, shortly before the outbreak of the Land War in Ireland, the sixth edition of The Landowner's and Agents Practical Guide not only provides a history of land tenure in Ireland but also explains exactly what the legal rights and obligations of the landlord and land agent were towards their tenants. It is the definitive guide to land law in Ireland before the Land War changed everything.


As the author, Thomas de Moleyns, of her Majesty's Counsel, notes the law of landlord and tenant in Ireland differs enormously from that in England, mostly because of custom and conquest. Over forty six chapters and nearly 600 pages de Moleyns covers everything a landlord and his agent need to know, from Early Land Tenures of Ireland, through various kinds of tenancies, agreements for leases, rents, evictions, as well as the various land acts applicable in Ireland. There are also two chapters dealing with the Registry of Deeds and the Landed Estate Courts both of whose records are now excellent ways of tracing ancestors in Ireland.


De Moleyns makes reference to over 1000 legal cases in this extremely comprehensive and well researched body of work, making it an invaluable resource in understanding the history of landownership in Ireland, the legal position of landowners in Ireland, and provides an insight in to the beginning of the Land War in Ireland and what rights the tenants were seeking. 



*  Thomas Wight, 4th Edition, A History of the Rise and Progress of the People called Quakers in Ireland, from the year 1653-1751

IE0346:  $16.00

This fourth edition of A History of the Rise and Progress of a People called Quakers in Ireland was first compiled by Thomas Wight, covering the years 1653 to 1700 and was later updated to 1751 by the physician and naturalist John Rutty. The book begins with the first appearance of Quakers in Ireland and the first chapter concludes in 1669 with the settlement of "church discipline" among them. The second chapter covers up to the end of the troubles under King James II. Chapter three deals with the period up to the Act of Parliament which allowed for the registration of the meeting houses of the Society of Friends, in 1719. The final chapter ends in 1751 with the church in danger from "a spirit of libertinism and luke-warmness". The book then concludes with a Summary of the sufferings of Quakers in Ireland. 



*  Reports from Commissioners, Irish Education Inquiry, Second Report, Schools of all Denominations, 1826

IE0347:  $37.10

The Second Report of the Commissioners of Irish Education Inquiry is a fascinating insight in to the state of education in pre-famine Ireland as well as being a wonderful genealogical source, listing some 12,530 Masters and Mistresses of schools.


The report was published in 1826, from an abstract of returns by both Protestant and Roman Catholic clergy for the year 1824. The Report is in two parts; the actual report and the appendices. The report part is quite short, a little over twenty pages, and it lays out the distribution of schools by province, religion, male to female ratio, as well as any societies the schools were associated with, such as the Association for Discountenancing Vice or the Board of Erasmus Smith's Trustees.


The second part is the twenty two appendices of this report, stretched over 1,200 pages, which provides the most useful information. Here the information is broken down to County level and individual school level. Appendix 22 is the longest and most fulsome. It lists 11,823 individual schools, the Barony and Parish, townland, who the Master or Mistress is, as well as their religion. It also lists if the school is free or fee paying, the total income of the Master or Mistress, a description of the school house and its probable cost. Finally the report includes the break down of children attending by religion, as well as any societies the schools is associated with, if local patronage is provided, and if scriptures are read at the school.


The information provided by this report gives an idea of what it was like to attend school in Ireland in 1824. For example the school in Castletown, Island Magee, in Antrim was listed as a fee paying school. It had 23 Protestant children attending, and the school house was described as "a barn; in a wretched condition".


This is a must have source for anyone with an interest in Irish education and for anyone trying to trace family involved in education in pre-famine Ireland. 



*  Jeremiah King, County Kerry Past and Present, A Handbook to the Local and Family History of the County, 1931

IE0349:  $24.70

Published in 1931 and written by Jeremiah King (who died before the book was published) this is a wonderful source for anyone researching local or family history in Kerry. In short this is an alphabetical listing of places and family names for the county spread over 350 pages.


King took copious notes from several sources, including census records, Griffith's Valuation, the Tithe Applotment books, various histories of the county, local lore and oral history. The book is organised alphabetically with an entry for every townland name (giving acreage and alternate names), other placenames, surnames (often with a full pedigree for certain families), individuals, topics, etc. For each entry there is extensive information provided.


It is an essential resource for those studying Kerry local and family history, and we hope this republication will bring back to light a sadly forgotten mine of useful information.



*  Lieutenant General Sir F.J. Aylmer, BART, V.C., K.C.B., The Aylmers of Ireland, 1931

IE0350:  $24.70

Published in 1931 and written by Lieutenant General Sir Fenton John Aylmer this is one of the most comprehensive single family histories published in Ireland. Having conducted large amounts of research into the family in both England and Ireland, Aylmer began his work with his own ancestors, the Aylmers of Ireland, adding to the findings already published in peerages such as the work of Lodge, Burke and Debrett.


Beginning with the earliest known Aylmers in Ireland, debating whether or not the first Aylmers came over with Strongbow, continuing right up to the 18th Century and some information after that. The volume focuses on four main parts of the family, the Aylmers of Meath, the Aylmers of Donadea, the Aylmers of Ballykenane and Painstown, and the Aylmers of Lyons. There are also chapters on several of the most notable family members, the Chief Justice Sir Gerald Aylmer, Sir Gerald Aylmer 1st Baronet of Donadea and Admiral Matthew, 1st Lord Aylmer of Balrath, as well as several chapter on unidentified Aylmers in the 16th, 17th, 18th Centuries and after. The final three chapters are devoted exclusively to the lands of the Aylmers in Ireland. Accompanying the text are 14 Pedigree lists and 19 illustrations. The book concludes with the Roll of Honour of those who died in service during the First World War and a 36 page extensive index.



*  W.P. O'Brien, The Great Famine in Ireland and a Retrospect of the fifty years 1845-1895

IE0351:  $18.50

Title continues: with a sketch of the present condition and future prospects of the Congested Districts


Written by W. P. O'Brien, and published in 1896, The Great Famine in Ireland is the observations of a civil servant of the causes and results of the famine in Ireland, as well as changes in the subsequent 50 years and recommendations as to how the Congested Districts could be improved. It is the insight and interpretations of a government official in Ireland.


O'Brien begins his sketch by "setting the scene" in Ireland on the eve of the Famine, describing the political situation, the agricultural system as it existed, how the poor law system had been introduced in Ireland as well as the numerous previous potato crop failures. Following on from this he deals with the outbreak of the disease in the crop in Ireland, its symptoms and effects, the extent of the failure of the crop in 1845 and the total failure in 1846. Also covered are the steps taken by the government for the purposes of relief in 1846 and 1847, including the Board of Works. The major part of this relief was the work of the Poor Law Commission and the extension of the workhouse system. There is mention of work carried out by private sources such as the Society of Friends and the British Relief Association, as well as by private individuals like Mr. J. H. Tuke.


The final part of the publication is made up with a review of Ireland after the famine, the improvements made, the success of the emigration schemes promoted by Mr. Tuke, and plans for dealing with further potato crop failures and how the Congested Districts Boards can be modified to deal with future emergencies.



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6 NEWS & GOSSIP:

If any of you have genealogy related questions of a general nature - or something specifically related to Archive CD Books - we'd be glad to publish your question in this newsletter to tap into the enormous fund of knowledge which I know is out there.


I see it was last November I reported the “takeover” of the World Vital Records web resource by the Swiss owned company Myherritage.com.  So far all the consequences of this major shift have been positive!  All the resources of WVR (World Vital Records) have been maintained and subscribers to both data sources have received very favourable offers to add the resources of the other.  


Of course, making any major changes in such a complicated data resource would require careful planning and plenty of testing to make sure it all worked so I’m not too surprised that we haven’t seem any significant changes - but I don’t think we can rule out the possibility yet.


Overall, however, it seems to have been a change for the better!


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WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE?

On 7 January we passed along, on our Facebook page, news of a new season of “Who Do You Think You Are” to be “aired” here in North America.  We know from the response we see there that this is a popular show with genealogists so this is good news for those who are able to receive the US NBC network.


For the rest of you, NBC generally make at least parts of the episodes available through their web-site:

http://www.nbc.com/who-do-you-think-you-are/video/?view=thumbnail

I don’t believe there are any “regionalization” restrictions of accessing these videos.


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WE'RE ON FACEBOOK:

We use our Facebook page to spread the word about notable events, special offers and just plain old “scuttlebutt” which we think will be of interest to Canadian genealogists, and which may have a short “shelf life.” To me, being a Canadian genealogist means having roots in other parts of the World as well as right here.  In an effort to keep focused on the Canadian content I try to filter out a lot of the vast wave of US (only) news which tend to overwhelmed most news sources. 


In the last month genealogical news and special offers here is a count of our posts:

“Hints” & “Comments”; 18

Notice of Special Access, or Free Offers; 2 

We will also post immediate notification of our new releases.


Consider becoming a “Liker” so that, not only will you get all the "hot" news, but you can join in the ongoing discussions, or even pass on some tips and hints of your own.


If you have an item which you would like us to post on Facebook (and you don't wish to do it yourself) or you wish to have it posted in this newsletter then send it to me at:

Malcolm@ArchiveCDBooks.ca and we'll see what we can do.  (Please indicate if you would prefer we post it on Facebook as we may leave it to be posted in the newsletter otherwise.)


If you are already a Facebook member then you can find the Archive CD Books Canada wall at: 

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Archive-CD-Books-Canada/99339348650


If you have not yet joined Facebook you can use the same URL but you will need to "sign in" before you can read our wall.


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IMPORTANT NOTICE ABOUT EMAIL: 

Mail filters are becoming very aggressive and we are still getting newsletter subscriptions from addresses which subsequently reject our confirmation notices and postings. (We are routinely getting several reject notices a month - in spite of unsubscribing people after their third sequential rejection!)  If you hear of someone complaining that we ignored their newsletter subscription, or that we have stopped delivering to them, please tell them to check their rejected messages and to edit their personal filter to accept the ArchiveCDBooks.ca domain or the Malcolm@ArchiveCDBooks.ca address.  THANK YOU!


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7 FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY AND OTHER ANNOUNCEMENTS:

(We can include your Family History Societies announcements if you tell us what they are.  Please give us AT LEAST one month's notice.)


NEW__________

30 January 2012: 7:30 p.m.:  Toronto Branch, Ontario Genealogical Society - Toronto, ON, meeting.  Topic: Origins of Funeral Customs.  This talk will describe the origins of some of the funeral customs found in nineteenth-century Ontario and explain how they evolved through the years.  Speaker: Susan Smart

Burgundy Room, North York Memorial Community Hall, 5110 Yonge Street, Toronto

Details: http://www.torontofamilyhistory.org/meetings.html


NEW_________

7-28 February 2012: 2:00-4:00 p.m.  The Toronto Branch, Ontario Genealogical Society are presenting a 4 part Course on Family History Writing.  This 4-session course is designed for individuals who want to make progress with organizing their materials and writing up their research for personal or public use.  Instructor: Gayle Dzis.  At North York Central Library, 5120 Yonge Street, Toronto

Details: http://www.torontofamilyhistory.org/courses.html


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25 February 2012: 2:00-5:00 p.m.  The Toronto Branch, Ontario Genealogical Society - Toronto, ON are holding a half-day workshop, topic: Sharing Networks for Genealogists.  This workshop will offer new ideas and approaches to help researchers share genealogical data on-line safely and effectively.  Instructor: Marian Press  Venue: Toronto Reference Library, 789 Yonge Street, Toronto

Details: http://www.torontofamilyhistory.org/courses.html


NEW_________

25 February, 2012.  The Master Genealogist (software) Users Group, Ottawa is holding its monthly meeting at The Ottawa City Archives of Canada, Room 226, 100 Tallwood Dr., Ottawa, between 2 & 4 pm.  Meetings consist of general discussions, tip of the month, and one or more formal presentations.  Attendance is free to all.  Website: www.ottawa-tmg-ug.ca 

For more information contact: David Walker, david@ancestraltrails.ca


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27 February 2012: 7:30 p.m.  The Toronto Branch, Ontario Genealogical Society - Toronto, ON is holding a meeting, Topic: One Note.  This talk will demonstrate the use of Microsoft OneNote, a computer program for free-form information gathering and multi-user collaboration. Additional short presentation by Greg Marlatt: The Flight of William Lyon Mackenzie.

Speaker: Jim Onyschuk

Venue: Burgundy Room, North York Memorial Community Hall, 5110 Yonge Street, Toronto

Details: http://www.torontofamilyhistory.org/meetings.html


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8-22 March 2012: 6:15-8:15 p.m.The Toronto Branch, Ontario Genealogical Society - Toronto, ON are presenting a 3 session course, Topic: Creating a Family History Blog – for Genealogists.  This new 3-session course will be taught in a computer lab. It will provide all the information necessary to find and read blogs, but will concentrate on how to build one’s own blog to share family research.  Instructor: Marian Press.

Venue: Toronto Reference Library, 789 Yonge Street, Toronto

Details: http://www.torontofamilyhistory.org/courses.html


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20-27 March 2012: 5:15-8:15 p.m.  The Toronto Branch, Ontario Genealogical Society - Toronto, ON are presenting a 2 session course.  Topic: Exploring the Baldwin Room’s Manuscript Collection.  This advanced 2-session course will explore the important Canadian manuscript collection housed in the Baldwin Room at the Toronto Reference Library, with hands-on examination of several manuscript fonds.  Instructor: Jane E. MacNamara.

Venue: Toronto Reference Library, 789 Yonge Street, Toronto

Details: http://www.torontofamilyhistory.org/courses.html


NEW_________

24 March, 2012.  The Master Genealogist (software) Users Group, Ottawa is holding its monthly meeting at The Ottawa City Archives of Canada, Room 226, 100 Tallwood Dr., Ottawa, between 2 & 4 pm.  Meetings consist of general discussions, tip of the month, and one or more formal presentations.  Attendance is free to all.  Website: www.ottawa-tmg-ug.ca 

For more information contact: David Walker, david@ancestraltrails.ca

 

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26 March 2012: 7:30 p.m.  The Toronto Branch, Ontario Genealogical Society - Toronto, ON are holding a meeting, Topic: Unusual, Underused and Under appreciated Resources Online for Genealogists

Venue: Burgundy Room, North York Memorial Community Hall, 5110 Yonge Street, Toronto.

Details: http://www.torontofamilyhistory.org/meetings.html


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31 March, 2012.  The Toronto Branch of the OGS has announced a one-day Branch workshop on “Finding Your Great War Ancestors”, to be co-hosted by the Canadiana Department of North York Central Library.

Program and registration details for the workshop itself will follow when available.


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13 & 14 April, 2012.  The Alberta Genealogical Society and the Alberta Family History Society are joining forces to hold a giant genealogy fair, “Find your Tree in the Forrest,” in Red Dear, Alberta.  I’m told they already have 19 speakers booked for the meeting.  For more information go to the website: 

http://rdgensoc.ab.ca/conferenceindex.html


NEW_________

14 April, 2012.  The Master Genealogist (software) Users Group, Ottawa is holding its monthly meeting at The Ottawa City Archives of Canada, Room 226, 100 Tallwood Dr., Ottawa, between 2 & 4 pm.  Meetings consist of general discussions, tip of the month, and one or more formal presentations.  Attendance is free to all.  Website: www.ottawa-tmg-ug.ca 

For more information contact: David Walker, david@ancestraltrails.ca


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21 April, 2012, The  Ottawa Branch OGS is hosting their AGM and Genealogy Day at the NEW City of Ottawa Central Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario starting at 09:30.  Details and Agenda can be found at: http://ogsottawa.on.ca/?p=1989

In addition to a program of presentations there will be a marketplace supported by both commercial and “society” organizations. 

WE ARE REGISTERED FOR THE MARKETPLACE.  COME AND VISIT US IN PERSON.  THE ARCHIVE IS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC AS WELL AS THE “REGISTRANTS.”


NEW_________

12 May, 2012.  The Master Genealogist (software) Users Group, Ottawa is holding its monthly meeting at The Ottawa City Archives of Canada, Room 226, 100 Tallwood Dr., Ottawa, between 2 & 4 pm.  Meetings consist of general discussions, tip of the month, and one or more formal presentations.  Attendance is free to all.  Website: www.ottawa-tmg-ug.ca 

For more information contact: David Walker, david@ancestraltrails.ca


________

1st to 3rd, June, 2012.  Region VIII of the Ontario Genealogical Society (OGS) will host the Society’s annual Conference at St Lawrence College, Kingston, Ontario.  This is usually the largest Ontario conference of the year with as many as 700 genealogists attending.  There will be a large area for sales, displays, publications and information tables.

For details go to:  http://www.ogs.on.ca/conference

WE EXPECT TO BE PRESENTING OUR WARES IN THE CONFERENCE MARKETPLACE.

 

_________

25 August, 2012.  The Genealogical Association of Nova Scotia (GANS) is planning to hold a Celebration of their 30th anniversary.  More details to be announced soon.



NEW_________

8 September, 2012.  The Master Genealogist (software) Users Group, Ottawa is holding its monthly meeting at The Ottawa City Archives of Canada, Room 226, 100 Tallwood Dr., Ottawa, between 2 & 4 pm.  Meetings consist of general discussions, tip of the month, and one or more formal presentations.  Attendance is free to all.  Website: www.ottawa-tmg-ug.ca 

For more information contact: David Walker, david@ancestraltrails.ca


NEW_________

13 October, 2012.  The Master Genealogist (software) Users Group, Ottawa is holding its monthly meeting at The Ottawa City Archives of Canada, Room 226, 100 Tallwood Dr., Ottawa, between 2 & 4 pm.  Meetings consist of general discussions, tip of the month, and one or more formal presentations.  Attendance is free to all.  Website: www.ottawa-tmg-ug.ca 

For more information contact: David Walker, david@ancestraltrails.ca


NEW_________

10 November, 2012.  The Master Genealogist (software) Users Group, Ottawa is holding its monthly meeting at The Ottawa City Archives of Canada, Room 226, 100 Tallwood Dr., Ottawa, between 2 & 4 pm.  Meetings consist of general discussions, tip of the month, and one or more formal presentations.  Attendance is free to all.  Website: www.ottawa-tmg-ug.ca 

For more information contact: David Walker, david@ancestraltrails.ca


NEW_________

8 December, 2012.  The Master Genealogist (software) Users Group, Ottawa is holding its monthly meeting at The Ottawa City Archives of Canada, Room 226, 100 Tallwood Dr., Ottawa, between 2 & 4 pm.  Meetings consist of general discussions, tip of the month, and one or more formal presentations.  Attendance is free to all.  Website: www.ottawa-tmg-ug.ca 

For more information contact: David Walker, david@ancestraltrails.ca



DON'T FORGET WE CAN HELP YOUR GROUP TO SPREAD THE NEWS. E-MAIL US.


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8 PREVIOUSLY RELEASED BOOKS:

Archives of this newsletter showing all the previous release announcements are available in the newsletter archive which can be reached through,

http://www.ArchiveCDBooks.ca/NewsletterArchive.html


All our newly released books are listed on our web site in the "New Releases and Special Offers" page. Go to:

http://www.archivecdbooks.ca/new.html

for an instant update on our new products or look through the "New Releases" category in the on-line catalogue.



Archive CD Books Canada Inc.

Attn.: Malcolm Moody - President

P.O. Box 11,

Manotick, Ontario, K4M 1A2, Canada.

(613) 692-2667

e-mail: Malcolm@ArchiveCDBooks.ca

Canadian web site: http://www.archivecdbooks.ca